This tumblr is brought to you by the Office of Family, Youth, and Young Adult Ministry.

 

episcomc on Instagram

olanrogers:

"I hope those of you that are feeling discouraged right now know that you can do anything that you put your mind to. Even if it’s a national wide pizza party tour; you can do it.”

Hogwarts Pictures

(Source: phoenixings)

kschlabaugh:

Audrey Assad - “Good To Me” (Live at RELEVANT)

"I lift my eyes to the hills where my help is found.
Your voice fills the night raise my head up and hear the sound.
Though fires burn all around me I will praise You, my God.
And the foxes in the vineyard will not steal my joy.

Because You are good to me, good to me.
You are good to me, good to me.
You are good to me.”

EYE 2014 – EpiscoYouth

   Come on….

       What R you waiting 4?

         Apply And Get ur Swag on at Villanova University in Philly!

St. Hilary of Poitiers  315 A.D. - 367 A.D.
  Sometimes referred to as the “Hammer of the Arians" or the "Athanasius of the West,” Hilary was born in Poitiers either at the end of the 3rd or beginning of the 4th century. During his life, Hilary played an influential role in the great controversy between Athanasius, who taught that the Son is fully God, equally with the Father, and Arius, who denied this. When he refused to sign the condemnation of Athanasius, the Arian emperor Constantius II (a son of Emperor Constantine) banished him to Phrygia in 357 A.D. His exile lasted three years, during which time he wrote several important theological essays: De synodis; On the Trinity; and In Constantium. On his return to Gaul (France) in 361 A.D., he took a leisurely route through Greece and Italy, preaching against the Arians as he went. With the death of Constantius II in 361 A.D., the persecution of the orthodox Christians ended too. Sadly, Hilary died in 367 or 368 A.D. and was proclaimed a “Doctor” of the Church in 1851.
The Collect:

   O Lord our God, who raised up your servant Hilary to be a champion of the catholic faith: Keep us steadfast in that true faith which we professed at our baptism, that we may rejoice in having you for our Father, and may abide in your Son, in the fellowship of the Holy Spirit; who live and reign for ever and ever. 
              Amen.  

St. Hilary of Poitiers  315 A.D. - 367 A.D.

  Sometimes referred to as the “Hammer of the Arians" or the "Athanasius of the West,” Hilary was born in Poitiers either at the end of the 3rd or beginning of the 4th century. During his life, Hilary played an influential role in the great controversy between Athanasius, who taught that the Son is fully God, equally with the Father, and Arius, who denied this. When he refused to sign the condemnation of Athanasius, the Arian emperor Constantius II (a son of Emperor Constantine) banished him to Phrygia in 357 A.D. His exile lasted three years, during which time he wrote several important theological essays: De synodis; On the Trinity; and In Constantium. On his return to Gaul (France) in 361 A.D., he took a leisurely route through Greece and Italy, preaching against the Arians as he went. With the death of Constantius II in 361 A.D., the persecution of the orthodox Christians ended too. Sadly, Hilary died in 367 or 368 A.D. and was proclaimed a “Doctor” of the Church in 1851.

The Collect:

   O Lord our God, who raised up your servant Hilary to be a champion of the catholic faith: Keep us steadfast in that true faith which we professed at our baptism, that we may rejoice in having you for our Father, and may abide in your Son, in the fellowship of the Holy Spirit; who live and reign for ever and ever. 

              Amen.
 

St. Nicholas of Myra 
   Born during the third century in the village of Patara. At the time the area was Greek and is now on the southern coast of Turkey. His wealthy parents, who raised him to be a devout Christian, died in an epidemic while Nicholas was still young. Obeying Jesus’ words to “sell what you own and give the money to the poor,” Nicholas used his whole inheritance to assist the needy, the sick, and the suffering. He dedicated his life to serving God and was made Bishop of Myra while still a young man. Bishop Nicholas became known throughout the land for his generosity to those in need, his love for children, and his concern for sailors and ships.
   Under the Roman Emperor Diocletian, who ruthlessly persecuted Christians, Bishop Nicholas suffered for his faith, was exiled and imprisoned. The prisons were so full of bishops, priests, and deacons, there was no room for the real criminals—murderers, thieves and robbers. After his release, Nicholas attended the Council of Nicaea in AD 325. He died December 6, AD 343 in Myra and was buried in his cathedral church, where a unique relic, called manna, formed in his grave. This liquid substance, said to have healing powers, fostered the growth of devotion to Nicholas. The anniversary of his death became a day of celebration, St. Nicholas Day, December 6th. 

 The Collect:
Almighty God, who in your love gave to your servant Nicholas of Myra a perpetual name for deeds of kindness on land and sea: Grant, we pray, that your Church may never cease to work for the happiness of children, the safety of sailors, the relief of the poor, and the help of those tossed by tempests of doubt or grief; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.
     Amen. 

St. Nicholas of Myra 

   Born during the third century in the village of Patara. At the time the area was Greek and is now on the southern coast of Turkey. His wealthy parents, who raised him to be a devout Christian, died in an epidemic while Nicholas was still young. Obeying Jesus’ words to “sell what you own and give the money to the poor,” Nicholas used his whole inheritance to assist the needy, the sick, and the suffering. He dedicated his life to serving God and was made Bishop of Myra while still a young man. Bishop Nicholas became known throughout the land for his generosity to those in need, his love for children, and his concern for sailors and ships.

   Under the Roman Emperor Diocletian, who ruthlessly persecuted Christians, Bishop Nicholas suffered for his faith, was exiled and imprisoned. The prisons were so full of bishops, priests, and deacons, there was no room for the real criminals—murderers, thieves and robbers. After his release, Nicholas attended the Council of Nicaea in AD 325. He died December 6, AD 343 in Myra and was buried in his cathedral church, where a unique relic, called manna, formed in his grave. This liquid substance, said to have healing powers, fostered the growth of devotion to Nicholas. The anniversary of his death became a day of celebration, St. Nicholas Day, December 6th. 

 The Collect:

Almighty God, who in your love gave to your servant Nicholas of Myra a perpetual name for deeds of kindness on land and sea: Grant, we pray, that your Church may never cease to work for the happiness of children, the safety of sailors, the relief of the poor, and the help of those tossed by tempests of doubt or grief; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.
     Amen. 
"Live life like in the playing field"
    - Pope Francis